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SEPT23 to 25

Strategic Planning Kickoff Events

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Montezum Hall

OCT3

Monthly Meeting for Staff: Retirement (FERP, PRTB, Emeritus) 

3:00 pm to 4:00 pm

LL 431


NEW FACULTY SPOTLIGHT - College of Arts & Letters

Rosalva

Rosalva Alamillo

Dr. Rosalva Alamillo is a Sociolinguist specialized in Spanish as a heritage language. Her research areas of interest include the acquisition of Spanish as a second and as a heritage language, the influence of social environment in language acquisition and language use, and linguistic outcomes due to language contact. Currently, she is researching linguistic convergence from English into Spanish in nominal phrases in U.S. bilingual speakers. For future studies, she plans to research the influence of Spanish as an hegemonic language in indigenous heritage languages of Mexico.

Raj Chetty

Raj Chetty

Dr. Chetty specializes in Caribbean literature across English, Spanish, and French, with a focus on black and African diaspora. His current project, titled “On Refusal and Recognition”: Disparate Blackness in Dominican Literary and Expressive Cultures, studies blackness in the Dominican Republic from the 1940s through the present. He is the co-editor of a special issue of The Black Scholar on “Dominican Black Studies,” and his published essays are in Small Axe, Callaloo, Anthurium, Palimpsest: A Journal on Women, Gender, and the Black International, Afro-Hispanic Review, and Meridional: Revista Chilena de Estudios Latinoamericanos.

Catherine Clune-Taylor

Catherine Clune-Taylor

Dr. Clune-Taylor (she/her/hers) is Assistant Professor of Feminist Science and Technology Studies. In addition to a Ph.D. in Philosophy, she has a BMSc in Immunology and Microbiology. She teaches and writes in the fields (and at the intersections) of feminist theory, philosophy of gender and sexuality, philosophy of science (esp. philosophy of biology and medicine), critical disability studies, and bioethics. She is at work on a book critically exploring the science, ethics, and biopolitics underwriting all contemporary medical efforts which aim at securing “cisgendered futures” for minors, which includes both the management of intersex conditions under the “Disorders of Sex Development” treatment model, and the treatment of trans kids with so-called “conversion therapies”. Clune-Taylor has published articles in PhaenEx: Journal of Existential and Phenomenological Theory and Culture, the American Journal of Public Health, and Hypatia(Forthcoming 2019). Before joining SDSU, she was a Postdoctoral Research Associate in the Program in Gender and Sexuality Studies at Princeton University.

Diana Leong

Diana Leong

Dr. Leong is an assistant professor of English and Comparative Literature and her research interests include environmental justice, black literature and culture, speculative fiction, and the environmental humanities (e.g. new materialisms, critical animal studies, science and technology studies, and posthumanism). She is currently completing a monograph that theorizes the slave ship as a site for the material and imaginative convergence of environmental justice and abolitionism.

Nicole Mathwich

Nicole Mathwich

Dr. Nicole Mathwich is an archaeologist whose research explores how the Columbian Exchange shifted the relationships of humans, landscapes, and animals during the colonial period through zooarchaeology, social networks, stable isotopes, and historical documents. Dr. Mathwich received her BS from Santa Clara University, and her MA and PhD from the University of Arizona. Previously, she managed the zooarchaeological reference collections at the Arizona State Museum, the oldest and largest anthropological research museum in the Southwest. Over the past 7 years, her work in southern Arizona and northern Sonora examined how livestock and ranching affected Indigenous peoples of the Southwest. She is currently researching Indigenous water storage and landscape management changed during the Spanish colonial period using stable isotopes, and continues to work on zooarchaeological projects on Pimería Alta colonial sites, U.S. Calvary horses, and passerine birds in Little Colorado Pueblo III sites.

Amy Quandt

Amy Quandt

Dr. Quandt is a human ecologist and environmental social scientist specializing in the intersections of environmental conservation and rural livelihoods.  She received her Ph.D. in Environmental Studies from the University of Colorado Boulder, an M.S. in Resource Conservation from the University of Montana Missoula, and B.S. in Biology from the University of Puget Sound.  Before coming to SDSU, Dr. Quandt was working as the global coordinator for the Land-Potential Knowledge System Project, which works to increase access to biophysical information about their land for smallholder farmers globally through the LandPKS app. Her research and teaching interests include agroforestry, agriculture, mobile phone technologies, community-based conservation, climate change adaptation, social-ecological resilience, and mixed-methods (qualitative and quantitative) research.  She has spent significant time conducting field work in Tanzania, Kenya, Ethiopia, and Thailand. Dr. Quandt's work has recently been published in the journals Environmental Science and Policy, Climatic Change, World Development, and Ecology and Society.  She also has a book chapter on livelihood resilience to drought in East Africa being published shortly in the second edition of Angry Earth: Disaster in Anthropological Perspective.

Ron Shadbegian

Ron Shadbegian

Dr. Shadbegian was a Senior Research Economist at the EPA’s National Center for Environmental Economics. Ron was also a Senior Economist for Environment and Energy at President Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers (2013-2014) and was an Adjunct Professor at Georgetown University. His research focuses on: 1) the effects of early childhood lead exposure on children’s health, educational, and labor market outcomes; 2) the effect of air pollution on children and elderly's health and cognitive abilities; and 3) the impact of environmental regulations on electricity prices, employment, productivity, environmental performance, investment, and technological change.

Jess Whatcott

Jess Whatcott

Dr. Whatcott (they/them/theirs) is an interdisciplinary scholar who studies the intersecting histories of gender, sexuality, race, and disability in the United States. Their areas of focus include eugenics, incarceration, institutionalization, and related forms of state violence; critical and creative approaches to historiography; queer and crip theory; prison abolition, feminist bioethics, reproductive justice, and disability justice; and speculative fiction. Dr. Whatcott’s current research examines the role of eugenics theory in institutions of charity and correction – including state hospitals, homes for the feeble-minded, and adult and juvenile reformatories – in early twentieth century California.